"It doesn’t much matter what line of argument you take as a woman. If you venture into traditional male territory, the abuse comes anyway. It’s not what you say that prompts it—it’s the fact that you are saying it."
- Mary Beard, speaking at the British Museum in February. Rebecca Mead profiles the Cambridge academic and “troll slayer” in this week’s issue. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.
How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus
Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.

How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus

Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

humansofnewyork:

"I was seven years old when it happened. It was about 9 pm at night. We heard the neighbors screaming so we knew that the rebels were in the village. There were many people visiting in my house at the time, so all the men gathered in the main room. We had no guns, only knives. Soon the dog started barking, then we heard footsteps, and then we heard a knock on the door. They started calling for my father to come out. We didn’t answer, so they started shooting into the house. Everyone pushed against the door to try to keep it closed, but they knocked it down. My father saw that he couldn’t run, so he gave himself up. They took him away. Then they gathered all the men and boys, and marched us out of the back of the house. My brother tried to jump and climb up on the roof, but they saw him and shot him. I knew I had to try something different, so I waited until we were rounding a corner, and I jumped into a bush, and I kept crawling until I reached the other side, then I got up and ran. I ran all the way to the neighbor’s house, but they turned me away and locked the door. So I hid all night in the graveyard. The next day I returned to my house. They’d taken everything. They dumped my sick mother onto the floor and took her mattress. I found my father’s body in the barn. They’d cut off his arms and his legs.”(Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"I was seven years old when it happened. It was about 9 pm at night. We heard the neighbors screaming so we knew that the rebels were in the village. There were many people visiting in my house at the time, so all the men gathered in the main room. We had no guns, only knives. Soon the dog started barking, then we heard footsteps, and then we heard a knock on the door. They started calling for my father to come out. We didn’t answer, so they started shooting into the house. Everyone pushed against the door to try to keep it closed, but they knocked it down. My father saw that he couldn’t run, so he gave himself up. They took him away. Then they gathered all the men and boys, and marched us out of the back of the house. My brother tried to jump and climb up on the roof, but they saw him and shot him. I knew I had to try something different, so I waited until we were rounding a corner, and I jumped into a bush, and I kept crawling until I reached the other side, then I got up and ran. I ran all the way to the neighbor’s house, but they turned me away and locked the door. So I hid all night in the graveyard. The next day I returned to my house. They’d taken everything. They dumped my sick mother onto the floor and took her mattress. I found my father’s body in the barn. They’d cut off his arms and his legs.”

(Kampala, Uganda)

npr:

The tech giant has launched a new tool for teachers. “Google Classroom” is paperless, and integrates with the rest of Google’s apps, like Google Docs. 
While it’s too soon to tell how Classroom will be received, Google Apps for Education is already changing how early adopters teach — and raising some important questions about the transition to tech-enabled classrooms.
Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

npr:

The tech giant has launched a new tool for teachers. “Google Classroom” is paperless, and integrates with the rest of Google’s apps, like Google Docs. 

While it’s too soon to tell how Classroom will be received, Google Apps for Education is already changing how early adopters teach — and raising some important questions about the transition to tech-enabled classrooms.

Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

teaching education google

Emmy Winners Mostly Fall Behind TV’s Pay Wall

And that makes the Emmys, a ceremony that is always carried by a broadcast network, a paradox: a water-cooler event that increasingly exalts the boutique, paid-for television experience. The master of ceremonies, Seth Meyers, made a sardonic joke about network television holding an awards show and giving all the trophies to cable and other services. “That would be crazy,” he said. “Why would they do that?”

Especially in Hollywood, where stars are demigods who see themselves as egalitarian champions of the masses, the two televisions are an unsettling echo of so many other disparities that make up the two Americas, the top 1 percent — with their private planes, private schools, personal chefs and organic markets — and everybody else.

Continue reading

By Alessandra Stanley

New York Times

emmys emmys 2014 cable tv

fotojournalismus:

Liberia Battles Spreading Ebola Epidemic 

The World Health Organization reported on August 19 that more than 1,200 people have died in the massive Ebola outbreak across West Africa, with Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone at the epicenter. The situation, officials say, is considered “out of control.”

John Moore, a photojournalist with Getty Images based in New York, is in Monrovia to document what has quickly become the deadliest Ebola outbreak on record. (via TIME

Photos by John Moore/Getty Images (August 13-15, 2014) | See the whole set here.

(via gettyimages)

ebola west africa health outbreak