npr:

A few years ago, award-winning animal photographer Seth Casteel became an overnight sensation when his photos of dogs underwater went viral. What followed was a book deal that resulted in the New York Times best-seller Underwater Dogs.

Casteel’s new book, out Sept. 16, is possibly the only thing cuter thanUnderwater Dogs: Underwater Puppies.

Casteel on the logistics of photographing puppies underwater

I’m wearing a dog costume so that the dogs can feel like I’m one of the pack. … Just kidding. … I usually just wear a wet suit just in case. You know, if you spend 12 hours in a pool with a bunch of dogs, inevitably you’re going to get scratched up a little bit. So I do wear a wet suit. But I just hold my breath — that’s about it. I’m underwater sometimes just a few seconds, sometimes 30 seconds, 60 seconds. But I have my wet suit on. I bring the toys. I bring the fun. And we just have a blast.

Ridiculously Cute Underwater Puppies (You’re Welcome)

Photo credit: Seth Casteel/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

reportagebygettyimages:

More than a year of unprecedented violence has plunged Central African Republic (CAR) into perhaps the most unstable and bloodiest era of its history. Armed groups called anti-balaka, comprised of Christians and animists who were initially organized to fight local crime, are seeking revenge mostly against the Muslim minority for a cycle of looting, torture and killing that began after the mainly Muslim rebel coalition Séléka seized power in March 2013. Anti-balaka refuses to lay down their arms. Instead, they hunt and kill Muslims who remain in areas under their control or those who attempt to flee.

Photographer William Daniels has been awarded a 2014 Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for his project ‘CAR in Chaos.’ Read more about William and the project here.

(via globalpost)

nprcodeswitch:

Scenes From The Ferguson We Didn’t See On TV

Ferguson isn’t a very big town; all those flash bangs and the tear gas canisters were going off just behind people’s homes or in front of their small businesses. In many ways, it’s your typical American suburb. The photographer Eric Kayne and I walked around the neighborhood chatting with as they worked or relaxed, enjoying the last few weeks of summer, even as their town had become the most recent locus for Our Ongoing National Conversation on Race.

(Photo credit: Eric Kayne for NPR)

nprcodeswitch:

Scenes From The Ferguson We Didn’t See On TV

Ferguson isn’t a very big town; all those flash bangs and the tear gas canisters were going off just behind people’s homes or in front of their small businesses. In many ways, it’s your typical American suburb. The photographer Eric Kayne and I walked around the neighborhood chatting with as they worked or relaxed, enjoying the last few weeks of summer, even as their town had become the most recent locus for Our Ongoing National Conversation on Race.

(Photo credit: Eric Kayne for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

U.S. Doctor Didn’t Treat Ebola Patients Yet Still Caught The Virus
Christian aid group SIM has identified the third American to catch the disease as Dr. Rick Sacra.
The 51-year-old family physician from Massachusetts has been working on and off in Liberia with his wife, Debbie, since 1995. He joined SIM in the late ’80s and between 2008 and 2010 was the acting medical director at the group’s ELWA Hospital in Monrovia. He had previously served as the group’s Liberia director for several years.
Sacra volunteered to help with the current Ebola outbreak back in August, shortly after Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly — the first two Americans to catch Ebola — fell sick. Writebol, a health care worker, was also with SIM and Brantly was with Samaritan’s Purse.
"Rick called and said ‘I’m ready to go,’ " SIM’s president Bruce Johnson told reporters at a press conference today. "They [Sacra and another doctor who was not identified] knew the risks going in."
Sacra was at the obstetrics ward seeing pregnant mothers — some of whom were turned away from other crowded facilities in Liberia. He did not treat Ebola patients.
Exactly how Sacra caught the virus remains unknown. The obstetrics ward is located at the main hospital, which is separate from the Ebola isolation unit. Johnson said Sacra was following all the precautions advised by CDC and Doctors Without Borders, including wearing protective gear.
Continue reading.
Photo: Dr. Rick Sacra, who had worked in Liberia in previous years, went back in August to tend to pregnant women and to children. The 51-year-old Massachusetts family physician is the third American to contract the Ebola virus. (Courtesy of SIM)

nprglobalhealth:

U.S. Doctor Didn’t Treat Ebola Patients Yet Still Caught The Virus

Christian aid group SIM has identified the third American to catch the disease as Dr. Rick Sacra.

The 51-year-old family physician from Massachusetts has been working on and off in Liberia with his wife, Debbie, since 1995. He joined SIM in the late ’80s and between 2008 and 2010 was the acting medical director at the group’s ELWA Hospital in Monrovia. He had previously served as the group’s Liberia director for several years.

Sacra volunteered to help with the current Ebola outbreak back in August, shortly after Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly — the first two Americans to catch Ebola — fell sick. Writebol, a health care worker, was also with SIM and Brantly was with Samaritan’s Purse.

"Rick called and said ‘I’m ready to go,’ " SIM’s president Bruce Johnson told reporters at a press conference today. "They [Sacra and another doctor who was not identified] knew the risks going in."

Sacra was at the obstetrics ward seeing pregnant mothers — some of whom were turned away from other crowded facilities in Liberia. He did not treat Ebola patients.

Exactly how Sacra caught the virus remains unknown. The obstetrics ward is located at the main hospital, which is separate from the Ebola isolation unit. Johnson said Sacra was following all the precautions advised by CDC and Doctors Without Borders, including wearing protective gear.

Continue reading.

Photo: Dr. Rick Sacra, who had worked in Liberia in previous years, went back in August to tend to pregnant women and to children. The 51-year-old Massachusetts family physician is the third American to contract the Ebola virus. (Courtesy of SIM)

gettyimages:

Repost from @garethgetty via Taxi to a shoot @gettyimages @gettyvip #venicefilmfestival #venice #blackandwhitephoto #blackandwhitephotography #venezia71

gettyimages:

Repost from @garethgetty via Taxi to a shoot @gettyimages @gettyvip #venicefilmfestival #venice #blackandwhitephoto #blackandwhitephotography #venezia71

"It doesn’t much matter what line of argument you take as a woman. If you venture into traditional male territory, the abuse comes anyway. It’s not what you say that prompts it—it’s the fact that you are saying it."
- Mary Beard, speaking at the British Museum in February. Rebecca Mead profiles the Cambridge academic and “troll slayer” in this week’s issue. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.
How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus
Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.

How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus

Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

humansofnewyork:

"I was seven years old when it happened. It was about 9 pm at night. We heard the neighbors screaming so we knew that the rebels were in the village. There were many people visiting in my house at the time, so all the men gathered in the main room. We had no guns, only knives. Soon the dog started barking, then we heard footsteps, and then we heard a knock on the door. They started calling for my father to come out. We didn’t answer, so they started shooting into the house. Everyone pushed against the door to try to keep it closed, but they knocked it down. My father saw that he couldn’t run, so he gave himself up. They took him away. Then they gathered all the men and boys, and marched us out of the back of the house. My brother tried to jump and climb up on the roof, but they saw him and shot him. I knew I had to try something different, so I waited until we were rounding a corner, and I jumped into a bush, and I kept crawling until I reached the other side, then I got up and ran. I ran all the way to the neighbor’s house, but they turned me away and locked the door. So I hid all night in the graveyard. The next day I returned to my house. They’d taken everything. They dumped my sick mother onto the floor and took her mattress. I found my father’s body in the barn. They’d cut off his arms and his legs.”(Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"I was seven years old when it happened. It was about 9 pm at night. We heard the neighbors screaming so we knew that the rebels were in the village. There were many people visiting in my house at the time, so all the men gathered in the main room. We had no guns, only knives. Soon the dog started barking, then we heard footsteps, and then we heard a knock on the door. They started calling for my father to come out. We didn’t answer, so they started shooting into the house. Everyone pushed against the door to try to keep it closed, but they knocked it down. My father saw that he couldn’t run, so he gave himself up. They took him away. Then they gathered all the men and boys, and marched us out of the back of the house. My brother tried to jump and climb up on the roof, but they saw him and shot him. I knew I had to try something different, so I waited until we were rounding a corner, and I jumped into a bush, and I kept crawling until I reached the other side, then I got up and ran. I ran all the way to the neighbor’s house, but they turned me away and locked the door. So I hid all night in the graveyard. The next day I returned to my house. They’d taken everything. They dumped my sick mother onto the floor and took her mattress. I found my father’s body in the barn. They’d cut off his arms and his legs.”

(Kampala, Uganda)